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The grant will fund the rehabilitation of eligible buildings located in the Missouri State Capitol Historic District or the Munichburg Commercial Historic District, outlined above.

At the end of August the National Park Service announced Jefferson City would be awarded $675,000 through the Paul Bruhn Historic Revitalization Grant Program. This national grant program helps enable the rehabilitation of historic properties and rehabilitate, protect, and foster the economic development of rural communities.

In 2020, the City of Jefferson contracted Walter P. Moore and Associates to conduct a street-level structural survey of 100 load-bearing masonry buildings within the Missouri State Capitol Historic District and the Munichburg Commercial Historic District. Properties were assigned a condition rating of Green, Yellow, or Red, based on the severity of observations.

Several items in need of immediate actions were noted during the assessment including, delaminated cornices at several locations, significantly leaning wall parapets, and bowing out loose masonry that presented overhead fall hazards. Also noted were distinctive distress conditions such as deteriorated mortar joints, spalled bricks, cracks in masonry, cracks in sill stones and cornices, deteriorated capstones or coping tiles, deteriorated or cracked stucco or Exterior Insulation and Finish Systems (EIFS), and peeling paint.

Although concerning, these observations are common for historic unreinforced masonry structures with deferred or minimal maintenance. These buildings are located in some of the key historic areas of the community. While it was not surprising to learn about these issues, it reinforced the need to act quickly to preserve the integrity of the buildings.

The final report generated individual profiles for the buildings that were surveyed and identified key observations of the deterioration of one hundred load-bearing masonry buildings. The report solidified that 59% of the buildings in the survey area are in need of minor to major repair.

The Missouri State Capitol Historic District contains more than 100 structures (commercial and institutional) that developed around and in support of the establishment of the State Capitol in Jefferson City (1826). Currently, the area is known as "Downtown" and is mostly comprised of load bearing masonry with a period of significance between 1850-1950.

The Munichburg Commercial Historic District includes nine properties, also presumed to be load bearing masonry, with a period of significance between 1892-1951. The Munichburg Commercial Historic District is significant due to the rare intact collection of commercial architecture linked to German-American business owners. Most of the buildings are still utilized the same as the original purpose and some businesses are still operated by the same family name.

In recent years, residents have seen how both age and weather can damage a building. In 2018, a building at 200 East High Street partially collapsed and was eventually demolished. Also in 2018, the Amtrak Station located within the Union Hotel, a State Historic Site, had to be moved to a temporary trailer due to a bowing north wall. Preservation groups, such as Historic City of Jefferson, are looking at ways to preserve the Union Hotel. Adding to the challenges for the historic buildings in the community was the EF-3 tornado that traveled within two blocks from the east boundary of the National Register Districts.

To alleviate issues identified and to provide support for property owners of Jefferson City’s historic resources, the City applied to the National Park Service for the Paul Bruhn Historic Revitalization Grant. On August 30, 2021, the City was notified that it was one of eleven grant recipients in the nation, and will receive $675,000.

The grant will fund the rehabilitation of contributing buildings located in the Missouri State Capitol Historic District or the Munichburg Commercial Historic District, with preference given to properties with a condition rating of Yellow or Red.  Eligible projects include the physical preservation of eligible buildings, as well as architectural and engineering services.

The City of Jefferson views the Historic Revitalization Grant Program as an incentive for property owners to complete the recommendations that were provided in the structural survey. Eligible applicants must own a contributing structure in either the Missouri State Capitol Historic District or the Munichburg Commercial Historic District. Preference will be given to buildings that have been given the “Yellow” or “Red” condition rating in the structural survey. Projects that can demonstrate new commercial and/or residential space will earn application points. Applicants are not required to make a match, but level of match will be a competitive factor.

It is anticipated the program will fund 5-7 awards that will generate a $1.5 million investment Downtown. Applications, guidelines, and a scoring matrix will be provided to applicants. The awarding body will be apolitical and likely a citizen body. Recipients will enter into a 2-year grant agreement with the City of Jefferson.

Staff within the City of Jefferson are hopeful that this project will serve as a pilot program for what publicly funded “bricks and mortar” projects can do for the community. By leveraging private investment dollars to pair with a locally funded program, the project’s success could foster a sustainable funding mechanism for generations to come.

At the end of August the National Park Service announced Jefferson City would be awarded $675,000 through the Paul Bruhn Historic Revitalization Grant Program. This national grant program helps enable the rehabilitation of historic properties and rehabilitate, protect, and foster the economic development of rural communities.

In 2020, the City of Jefferson contracted Walter P. Moore and Associates to conduct a street-level structural survey of 100 load-bearing masonry buildings within the Missouri State Capitol Historic District and the Munichburg Commercial Historic District. Properties were assigned a condition rating of Green, Yellow, or Red, based on the severity of observations.

Several items in need of immediate actions were noted during the assessment including, delaminated cornices at several locations, significantly leaning wall parapets, and bowing out loose masonry that presented overhead fall hazards. Also noted were distinctive distress conditions such as deteriorated mortar joints, spalled bricks, cracks in masonry, cracks in sill stones and cornices, deteriorated capstones or coping tiles, deteriorated or cracked stucco or Exterior Insulation and Finish Systems (EIFS), and peeling paint.

Although concerning, these observations are common for historic unreinforced masonry structures with deferred or minimal maintenance. These buildings are located in some of the key historic areas of the community. While it was not surprising to learn about these issues, it reinforced the need to act quickly to preserve the integrity of the buildings.

The final report generated individual profiles for the buildings that were surveyed and identified key observations of the deterioration of one hundred load-bearing masonry buildings. The report solidified that 59% of the buildings in the survey area are in need of minor to major repair.

The Missouri State Capitol Historic District contains more than 100 structures (commercial and institutional) that developed around and in support of the establishment of the State Capitol in Jefferson City (1826). Currently, the area is known as "Downtown" and is mostly comprised of load bearing masonry with a period of significance between 1850-1950.

The Munichburg Commercial Historic District includes nine properties, also presumed to be load bearing masonry, with a period of significance between 1892-1951. The Munichburg Commercial Historic District is significant due to the rare intact collection of commercial architecture linked to German-American business owners. Most of the buildings are still utilized the same as the original purpose and some businesses are still operated by the same family name.

In recent years, residents have seen how both age and weather can damage a building. In 2018, a building at 200 East High Street partially collapsed and was eventually demolished. Also in 2018, the Amtrak Station located within the Union Hotel, a State Historic Site, had to be moved to a temporary trailer due to a bowing north wall. Preservation groups, such as Historic City of Jefferson, are looking at ways to preserve the Union Hotel. Adding to the challenges for the historic buildings in the community was the EF-3 tornado that traveled within two blocks from the east boundary of the National Register Districts.

To alleviate issues identified and to provide support for property owners of Jefferson City’s historic resources, the City applied to the National Park Service for the Paul Bruhn Historic Revitalization Grant. On August 30, 2021, the City was notified that it was one of eleven grant recipients in the nation, and will receive $675,000.

The grant will fund the rehabilitation of contributing buildings located in the Missouri State Capitol Historic District or the Munichburg Commercial Historic District, with preference given to properties with a condition rating of Yellow or Red. Eligible projects include the physical preservation of eligible buildings, as well as architectural and engineering services.

The City of Jefferson views the Historic Revitalization Grant Program as an incentive for property owners to complete the recommendations that were provided in the structural survey. Eligible applicants must own a contributing structure in either the Missouri State Capitol Historic District or the Munichburg Commercial Historic District. Preference will be given to buildings that have been given the “Yellow” or “Red” condition rating in the structural survey. Projects that can demonstrate new commercial and/or residential space will earn application points. Applicants are not required to make a match, but level of match will be a competitive factor.

It is anticipated the program will fund 5-7 awards that will generate a $1.5 million investment Downtown. Applications, guidelines, and a scoring matrix will be provided to applicants. The awarding body will be apolitical and likely a citizen body. Recipients will enter into a 2-year grant agreement with the City of Jefferson.

Staff within the City of Jefferson are hopeful that this project will serve as a pilot program for what publicly funded “bricks and mortar” projects can do for the community. By leveraging private investment dollars to pair with a locally funded program, the project’s success could foster a sustainable funding mechanism for generations to come.